Get FREE SHIPPING Now! Spend $55.00 or more.

Loose-Leaf Black Tea

All teas, including black teas, come from the same plant, the Camellia sinensis, with the exception of herbal teas. Classification or categorization of teas is determined by how much the leaves are oxidized during preparation. Black tea leaves are fully oxidized; more oxidized than all other teas, and as a result, they are richer than others in taste and flavor. 

What are black teas? 

Black teas are derived from Camellia plants Var. and the subspecies, Assamica. This differentiation and the level of oxidation in the production of black teas allow them to retain their flavor for many years, unlike green teas. This has made them a more popular option among teas. Black teas are normally named after the region from which they are derived, such as Assam, Darjeeling, Nepali, etc. Black teas brew from reddish-brown to dark brown. They are the most popular types of teas in the West, although green teas have seen a rise in popularity recently.  India is the largest exporter in the world. Other nations that produce black teas are Kenya, Turkey, Sri Lanka, Australia, and Indonesia. 

Brewing and Preparation 

The leaves of the broad Camellia plant are plucked and allowed to wither under the sun. Afterward, the leaves are crushed to activate the oxidation process. During oxidation, the leaves are allowed to turn black before they are fired in an oven—an action that halts the oxidation process. If all black tea leaves are prepared in this same way, how are they differentiated? As with everything else, black teas are affected by variations in terroir and cultivation. Beyond that, differentiation is made by grading. Teas are graded by the number of buds incorporated during production.  Preparation of loose-leaf black teas requires the use of pure water at its boiling point. If the water is cooler, the steep times can be longer to compensate for the lower temperature. 

Taste, Feel and Flavor 

Astringency plays a major role in the taste and feel of loose-leaf black teas. Astringency is loosely defined as a dry, rough, or fuzzy sensation on the palate that occurs when eating or drinking something. This sensation is a result of the sourness and bitterness which often is associated with ripe fruit. 

Black tea leaves have a flavor that feels like a blend of coffee and red wine. When tasting teas, your palate registers a raisin-like sweetness, a gentle lingering acidity, astringency, and a rich, velvety body. Although similar, black teas have different flavors. While some have more sweetness and astringency, some, like our popular Pu-Erh Tea, have more body than the rest. Ultimately, the taste of black teas is a measured crispness resulting from the various influencing factors, leaving it sweet but tart. It is not uncommon to hear this feel referred to as “brisk.”  The flavor, quality, and black teas’ other hard-to-describe factors are called mouthfeel. Some of our most popular black teas include our Assam Organic Tea and our mild Blue Sapphire Tea

Benefits of Black Teas 

Black teas contain some caffeine, which acts as a stimulant for the nervous system. However, with a lower caffeine content than coffee (about 1/3), and the presence of tannin, black teas' effects are not as strong as coffee, and not as immediate. The caffeine content in all teas, in general, is linked to terroir. Processing does not noticeably reduce or increase caffeine content. If you are concerned about caffeine, please try our decaffeinated black teas.   

Please try our loose-leaf black teas. Whenever possible, we offer organic versions of our loose-leaf teas.  

Size

Color

Brand

Price

All teas, including black teas, come from the same plant, the Camellia sinensis, with the exception of herbal teas. Classification or categorization of teas is determined by how much the leaves are oxidized during preparation. Black tea leaves are fully oxidized; more oxidized than all other teas, and as a result, they are richer than others in taste and flavor. 

What are black teas? 

Black teas are derived from Camellia plants Var. and the subspecies, Assamica. This differentiation and the level of oxidation in the production of black teas allow them to retain their flavor for many years, unlike green teas. This has made them a more popular option among teas. Black teas are normally named after the region from which they are derived, such as Assam, Darjeeling, Nepali, etc. Black teas brew from reddish-brown to dark brown. They are the most popular types of teas in the West, although green teas have seen a rise in popularity recently.  India is the largest exporter in the world. Other nations that produce black teas are Kenya, Turkey, Sri Lanka, Australia, and Indonesia. 

Brewing and Preparation 

The leaves of the broad Camellia plant are plucked and allowed to wither under the sun. Afterward, the leaves are crushed to activate the oxidation process. During oxidation, the leaves are allowed to turn black before they are fired in an oven—an action that halts the oxidation process. If all black tea leaves are prepared in this same way, how are they differentiated? As with everything else, black teas are affected by variations in terroir and cultivation. Beyond that, differentiation is made by grading. Teas are graded by the number of buds incorporated during production.  Preparation of loose-leaf black teas requires the use of pure water at its boiling point. If the water is cooler, the steep times can be longer to compensate for the lower temperature. 

Taste, Feel and Flavor 

Astringency plays a major role in the taste and feel of loose-leaf black teas. Astringency is loosely defined as a dry, rough, or fuzzy sensation on the palate that occurs when eating or drinking something. This sensation is a result of the sourness and bitterness which often is associated with ripe fruit. 

Black tea leaves have a flavor that feels like a blend of coffee and red wine. When tasting teas, your palate registers a raisin-like sweetness, a gentle lingering acidity, astringency, and a rich, velvety body. Although similar, black teas have different flavors. While some have more sweetness and astringency, some, like our popular Pu-Erh Tea, have more body than the rest. Ultimately, the taste of black teas is a measured crispness resulting from the various influencing factors, leaving it sweet but tart. It is not uncommon to hear this feel referred to as “brisk.”  The flavor, quality, and black teas’ other hard-to-describe factors are called mouthfeel. Some of our most popular black teas include our Assam Organic Tea and our mild Blue Sapphire Tea

Benefits of Black Teas 

Black teas contain some caffeine, which acts as a stimulant for the nervous system. However, with a lower caffeine content than coffee (about 1/3), and the presence of tannin, black teas' effects are not as strong as coffee, and not as immediate. The caffeine content in all teas, in general, is linked to terroir. Processing does not noticeably reduce or increase caffeine content. If you are concerned about caffeine, please try our decaffeinated black teas.   

Please try our loose-leaf black teas. Whenever possible, we offer organic versions of our loose-leaf teas.  

Earl Grey Supreme Loose Black Tea
$ 10.00
Keep lots of this Nobleman's tea on hand. You never know who might drop in. Imagine being a nobleman. Imagine living in the 1800's in England on a great sprawling manicured estate. On that estate, you tend to take your tea when the landscape is fresh and lush and the part of the day that is hectic is behind you or in front of you but is not now—No, now you are at peace. Now you retreat into all that is splendid. Ushering in the reflective, calm, you sit on your marble patio, drinking in both your dense, flavorful Earl Grey  tea as well as drinking in a breath of calm in your day.  Imagine being given your very own tea that is completely unique and tantalizingly refreshing. The second Earl Grey of England received an exquisite tea named in his honor in the early nineteenth century, thought to be a gift of diplomatic tribute....
Earl Grey with Lavender Loose Leaf Black Tea
$ 11.00
We started blending this tea in our shop, because so many people were requesting it.  It's a base of Earl Grey Supreme, mixed with some of our French lavender.  The two combined create a sophisticated European flavor, and a very relaxing aroma.  The bright purple lavender stands out well against the black tea both in color, and in its distinctive flavor.  The bergamot bridges the gap.  It's citrus flavor blends the lavender and black tea into a single experience.   Base leaf: Black tea. Health properties: Anti-oxidant properties, natural calming. Flavor strength: Moderate. Primary collection is lemony bergamot, relaxing Lavender over black tea. Caffeine: Moderate.
East Frisian Loose Black Tea
$ 10.00
A traditional black tea that calls for sugar and milk.  A tea whose name speaks volumes. Every tea is forever tied to its place of origin: that's the sublimely adaptable fact of the ancient beverage. But some show their character in spite of what one might expect based on their home. East Frisian is not one such tea. It's visceral mimicry of the grim, layered part of the world from which it hails is as clear as this black tea's.  On the North Eastern coast of Germany, Frisia is the sort of place that one might expect something stronger than tea is occasionally needed to make the gray days pass.  But from tough land comes tough people, and oftentimes the best sense of humor is found where men and women must work for their leisure time, if any is to be had. Thus, meet East Frisian tea: a full, almost steeled flavor that locals enrich even more...
English Breakfast - Organic Loose Black Tea
$ 12.00
 Although the English were not the first Europeans to bring tea from China, they certainly are credited to making it immensely popular.  In the early days, tea was a super luxury item and only the very rich (royalty and nobility) could afford.  IF YOU WANT A DECAF VERSION OF ENGLISH BREAKFAST CLICK HERE But whatever the "in crowd" liked the masses also wanted. As teas popularity increased, special fast sailing vessels called Clippers transported tea to the eager English tea drinkers. With the advent of steam ships, shipping became faster and less expensive.  As the British empire expanded and tea was grown in India and Africa and as transportation costs decreased and tea production increased, tea became less expensive, its popularity increased and demand soared. The masses adored it and it soon became a very English habit. Even though the English loved their tea, it is believed that the moniker English Breakfast...
Florence Loose Leaf Black Tea
$ 10.00
Florence is a rich blend of black loose leaf teas with chocolate and hazelnut flavors. It's a delicious, guiltless alternative to richer drinks like hot cocoa. Always the subtle romantic... aren't we? The soft murmur of the crowds sifting through the Piazza della Signoria, the song of swifts and goldfinches perched on the rooftops about the square, the far off voice of a street-side aria-for-hire; you may not be outside the Palazzo Vecchio sipping hot cocoa, but with this tea, you can dream you are. This Florentine inspired tea is so finely bold, Lucy Honeychurch herself could not pretend to be offended by its subtle decadence. Hints of chocolate, vanilla, almond and hazelnut pair seamlessly with the black tea, giving a medium body worth a second sip. The china black tea leaves keep the more unruly flavors in check, for a sophisticated balance sure enough to sooth your palate, and get people talking.  The chocolate and vanilla...
Harsha Loose Leaf Black Tea
$ 10.00
A top shelf blend of India's finest and prized Darjeeling and Assam black teas. Are you searching for a black tea with deep, bold flavor and comforting aromas? If so, HarSha is the perfect fit. HarSha, a Hindi word meaning “bliss”, is an aromatic tea with ingredients imported from the Indian villages of Darjeeling and Assam. Darjeeling is a small town known for it's aromatic, crisp teas and rich Bengali heritage. In the Eastern Himalayan hills, tea is cultivated by farmers whose talents run generations deep. Assam, located in northeastern India on the Bangladeshi border, is also famous for its fine teas, the production of which dates back to the early years of British colonization. The properties of Darjeeling and Assam teas are combined to produce a simple yet intricate network of blissful flavors. Harsha is tea mixture comprised of dark brown and golden leaves, mimicking the earthy tones of the north Indian landscape. Second flush Darjeeling leaves are...
Heaven Sent Loose Leaf Black Chai
$ 10.00
A totally organic mix of Masala spiced tea that will take you away to India. It’s undeniable: loose leaf chai holds the spotlight among young and new tea-drinkers. A sharp,distinct, rich blend whose warmth practically leaps out of the cup and hugs the drinker, chai is a bold but accessible tea. Much like India Pale Ales in the brewing world, the go-to drink bridging connoisseurs and casual drinkers is a distinctly spiced yet sophisticated blend: chai. It’s instantly recognizable (layered warmth filtering through milky cardamom) yet easily varied. And what variety there is. Each sip of this carefully-layered chai reveals different roles for each spice to play. Clove and cinnamon each bring uniquely astringent sweetness, with the first an ineffable and lingering flavor that cleanses the palate for what’s next. Cardamom and ginger offer distinctly eastern richness, sharpening and refining the base (black) leaf’s consistent clear taste and reminding that...
Hot Cinnamon Spice Loose Leaf Black Tea
$ 10.00
Our Best selling loose leaf tea. Warmth comes in a variety of shades and seasons, insinuating itself first in the intensely autumnal sight of this spiced black tea - Hot Cinnamon Spice tea. One can't help but picture a fire when confronted with the site of ember-like citrus chips atop a crisp smolder of black tea. It's the perfect blend to let heat tease out the lung-opening flavors, letting the tang spark your palette while the generous cinnamon bark adds heat. All that's missing is a fireside chair and your favorite novel. Order some now, you know you love this tea. Also available in caffeine free herbal with the same great taste. Click Below Caffeine Free Hot Cinnamon Spice Tea   Order 8 or 16 ounces and Save This loose leaf tea has depth, flavor and an aroma that adds edge to the idea of “cozy”, unable to be missed, even by the attentions of...
Ice Wine Loose Leaf Black Tea
$ 10.00
Pleasantly sweet tea with the deep aroma of captured sunshine and succulent winter harvested grapes.  Pains are taken in the preparation of this chilled-grape concoction. Frozen is actually a more accurate term to describe the state of the grapes that form this tea's flavor core.  Ice wine, which is the core of this tea is created slowly and methodically.  Through the summer the grapes grow and gather sugar basking in the sunshine.  In the early fall when other grapes are picked, these remain on the vine soaking up the last long rays of sun. They remain on the vine into the cold dark days of winter.  During this solitude, the grapes loose moisture and the residual sugar concentrates. Just when winter seems to never go away, the grapes are harvested and processed.  The resulting wine is deep in flavor and syrupy sweet.   Titled with the  “Eiswein” label, this blend does...
Irish Breakfast - Organic Loose Leaf Black Tea
$ 10.00
Looking for a strong cup? Look no further than Irish Breakfast. The Irish drink more tea per capita than anyone else in the world. This translate into roughly 6 cups a day, or a little over 7 pounds of tea, each year per Irishman. Suffice it to say, they like their tea. As we hinted at, they like it strong.  James Joyce, in his masterpiece Ulysses, wrote the following passage, a dialogue between two characters that pretty much sums up the Irish take on the noble beverage: "But, I say, Mulligan, you do make strong tea, don't you? Buck Mulligan, hewing thick slices from the loaf, said in an old woman's wheedling voice: 'When I makes tea, I makes tea.'" Maybe it's the cold damp weather, who knows, but as Joyce illustrates, the Irish know what to do with a teapot. The traditional Irish brew relies heavily on full-bodied, very malty teas from...
Keemun Panda #1 - Organic Loose Black Tea
$ 10.00
The loose black tea first introduced to the Europeans centuries ago and still beloved. What is Keeman Panda #1 and why is it causing such a stir among tea lovers? You may be surprised to know that Keeman Panda tea is among the most popular of teas. How, you say, can this be?  Keeman Panda #1 is a primary tea chosen for the ever-popular English Breakfast tea that we all enjoy. When tea first arrived in Europe, the Chinses choose to sell the Europeans black tea because it was less delicate than the green teas the Chinese preferred.  As such, Keemun loose leaf black tea became one of the first to be adopted by the English. Keemum is one of the teas hailing from China that requires a great deal of preparation know-how, a congou-type tea, meaning that it is a laborious process of twisting the tea leaf to form strips without breaking the leaves....
Lapsang Souchong - Organic Loose Leaf Black Tea
$ 12.00
Dare to try Lapsang Souchong. The smoky haze will either draw you in or not. A dark tea with smoke in its flavor: this Chinese black is a loose tea to be tried and re-tried, approached carefully, savored. Hailing from the Fujian province, this firmly caffeinated black tea will do more than wake you up: Lapsand Souchong will wake you up to a full oak fire, warming you in your mountain retreat about the Fujian landscape. Oak and smoke blending and trailing the corners of the room. The Wuyi mountains are home to this smoked black tea, whose distinct aroma made it one of the earliest internationally whispered-about blends, as its smoky quality appealed to a more exotic side of tea drinking, going far beyond a simple afternoon's pleasure. Lasang Souchong is an acquired taste for the adventurous tea drinker. Even its beginnings involve a bit of risk and innovation. The story is that the men waiting to...
Licorice Loose Leaf Black Tea
$ 10.00
Since ancient times, delicate and upset stomachs have appreciated the restorative properties of licorice tea. Sitting down after a long day, cupping a mug of steaming, soothing, aromatic tea is a ritual we have embraced throughout the centuries in the West and even longer in the East. Relaxation of the body and tranquility of the mind are synonymous with this ritual we all hold in such high esteem. Licorice Black Tea is the perfect antidote to today’s stressful lifestyles, but it takes this recuperative ritual one step further. Know for its healing properties, licorice over the millennia has been used as a tonic for digestive and respiratory ailments. As far back as Mesopotamia and the ancient Egyptian Empire, licorice root was used to inspire and soothe and was, purportedly, the favored root of the Pharaohs and was revered for these unique and coveted properties. Now you can enjoy this noble black...
Maple - Organic Loose Leaf Black Tea
$ 12.00
Put on your flannel and cozy up to this rich organic blend of backwoods sweetness. If you are from the North Country or just love maple syrup as well as a nice hot cup of tea, you must try Organic Maple tea, an understandable best seller. With a rich, distinctive flavor and unique capacity to warm even the most Canadian of chilled bones, this deep, rich and pungent black tea is laced with the most delicious of maple flavorings.The marriage of tart and woodsy with sweet and delectable, this black tea with its crave-worthy maple syrup taste ensures a perfect cup for a chilly night or a brisk morning. Drawn laboriously from the maple tree, maple sap is painstakingly boiled and reduced to a rich, golden, pungent and delicious aroma and taste all its own. An organic blend, this tea is suitable for the choosiest tea drinker to be sure, but...
Paris - Loose Leaf Black Tea
$ 10.00
Paris A black loose leaf tea that is as lovely as Paris the city of love. A blend as warm and suggestive as its namesake, Paris tempers a multi-layered black base with middling, distinct bakery-like sweetness invested in vanilla and caramel notes.   Melting Pot, a tantalizing term that most cities strive to have associated with them. Long has luxury been closely tied to variety. Thus it should come as little surprise that this rich, limber, sweet-tinged tea is based on a complex three-leaf base. From this, a traditional black flavour collection develops, reminding of nothing so much as a cup of Earl Grey before the sweetness sets in. Rove from morning task to morning task with this French tea-shop blend, sure to put an energetic spring in your step. Allow a bit of decadence into your busy schedule as this tea is sturdy enough to be an office-hours staple yet slyly sweet. Is it the...
Pomegranate Lemon - Organic Loose Leaf Black Tea
$ 12.00
Super food pomegranate and lemon blended with  black tea equals one delicious cup of tea. A subtly flavored, summery tea.  This tea brews to a particularly reddish color.  It has a bit of a sour tang to offset an otherwise fruity taste.  It's a stern sort of tea, in spite of the fruitness, a little like working in the summer.  Once you've gotten past the surprise of tasting a tea which is ever so slightly sour (as someone who does not use lemon, ever, I was very taken aback by this), it's light and fun.  After the lemon, the pomegranate notes come through, to create something very unique.   The tea flavor itself is not overpowering.  It is neither particularly bitter nor astringent.  This is a light summer tea, to drink casually.  The flavor is complicated enough to be very interesting, but not what I would call an acquired taste....
Pu-Erh - Organic Loose Black Tea
$ 10.00
With its deep earthy tones, Puerh offers a deep full bodied flavor akin to coffee. Like the aging of wine or spirits or the modes of distinguishing some cheeses; a tea's interaction with the elements - and the seeming wear they have on it – is part of its character and flavour. Pu-erh teas, from China's Yunnan Province, are the only fully-fermented family of tisanal blends. As yeast occurs among the dried leaves, they are carefull prepared and stored to allow fermentation to set in at an accelerated pace. The result? An earthy, singular brew. The sort that becomes an instant, intense favourite for some. This is a tea that no drinker will forget. Yunnan's expansive, storied relationship with tea speaks volumes. Origin of the very first cultivated tea trees; it is also the fitting home for this “final” blend, an elemental, dark, rich, heady tea that insists on its flavor, reducing even the most seasoned tea...
Red/Black Tea Set with 4 cups
$ 80.00
This Asian inspired tea set features a stunning red tea pot with floral accents. The lid is black and it has a bamboo handle to assist with pouring. Alongside your pot you will find 2 black cups and 2 red cups, representing the ying and the yang, and the balance of life. Sip and sit with thoughts of the balance of your own life.  1:4 TEA SET W/ STRAINER & BAMBOO HANDLE - "FUKU" (GOOD FORTUNE) TEA POT : 5.25"H, 42 fl.oz. CUP : 3"Dx3.25"H. 6 fl.oz. MICROWAVABLE (REMOVE HANDLE & STRAINER) DISHWASHER SAFE (REMOVE HANDLE)